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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. congress wasn't even in session this week. yet the fight over spending and debt raged on. with a march 1st deadline on the horizons democrats and republicans sparred about who would be blamed if budget cuts go into effect. the white house used its superior bully pulpit to grand effect. today we heard from the president and ray lahood, the cabinet's lone republican. >> what i'm trying to do is to wake up members of the congress on the republican side to the idea that they need to come to the table, offer a proposal so that we don't have to have this kind of calamity in air service in america. >> lahood said air traffic and safety would be drupted. defense secretary le onpennetta said the nation would billion less safe. republicans say it's overblown. how much does the public really care, john? >> well, it's a big deal. but it's not as dramatic as a government shutdown where everybody can see that the washington monument's closed. yo
woodruff. tonight begins a weeklong focus on guns here on pbs, "after newtown." on the newshour this evening, we look at political and other developments since the december tragedy and zero in on the gun debate in colorado. >> in the divisive atmosphere of the gun debate, both sides, at the federal and state level, say they know the coming months won't be easy. but they will be critical. >> ifill: then, we take up the arguments for and against the proposed construction of the keystone pipeline, as environmental activists mounted a protest this weekend. >> woodurff: ray suarez updates the hugo chavez story, after the president's surprise return to venezuela following more than two months of cancer treatment in cuba. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks with filmmaker kirby dick about his oscar-nominated documentary "the invible war," detailing the high rate of sexual assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape i
>> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to reverberate from coast to coast. >> now! ifill: as gun-control activists push for stricter laws. and gun owners chafe against the prospect of new regulation, crossing for... causing for now an increase in sale in firearms and attendance at gun shows. that dpebt is now spre
of special pbs coverage of gun violence draws to a close, we examine the ongoing debate in washington, in state houses in city halls. >> if a gun that was used 69 days ago to slaughter 20 children and six adults isn't an assault weapon, then they don't exist. >> a debate that is just beginning. covering the week, john harwood of cnbc and the "new york times." david sanger of the "new york times." molly ball of the atlantic, and sari horwitz of "the washington post." >> award-winning coverage and adge sys, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for washington week is provided by -- >> we know why we're here, to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by prudential. additional funding is provided by
a documentary with pbs's "frontline" on adam lanza. susan, you spoke with the connecticut state police. what are they telling you? >> as police put it, they're saying that "we're dealing with a shooter who is dead and now we're trying to rebuild history." police are downplaying the cbs report. quoting here, here's what they're telling me, "there's no basis to the cbs story. we have not established a motive. it's inaccurate. i talked with cbs and told them that. the cbs story is not accurate whatsoever." however, the spokesman also told me that the possibility that lanza was trying to outdo norway has not been ruled out nor has anything else. investigators reportedly suggest that adam lanza may have been trying to one-up another mass murder by topping anders breivik in norway, as you said he killed 77 people, mainly teenagers. cbs news quotes law enforcement sources who found evidence of that as a possible motive in newtown. part of the evidence? news articles. "the hartford courant" reports several stories about the massacre were discovered in one of lanza's two bedrooms. connecticut investi
, and welcome to this "pbs newshour" special coverage of president obama's "state of the union" address. we want you to know this program is also being livestreamed on our home page on the web. in just a few moments, the president will spell out his policy agenda for the start of his second term. he is expected tonight to focus mainly on jobs and the economy, and to highlight other domestic priorities including gun control and immigration reform, but also to touch on international challenges. here with me, as they will be throughout our coverage tonight, are syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. mark, what is different about a state of the union when it's the first one of a second term? >> you don't have that many more to look forward to? the sand is running out of the glass. this is probably the best shot that most presidents have in their second term is that first year-and-a-half before you get into congressional elections and the lame duckness really sets in. the race to succeed him begins while he's just sitting there. so this is important. this is th
for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org i was sitting there in tears in my living room watching it. we learned the truth about america. ed asner: white actors were willing to break each other's legs to be in the show. i mean, these novels were just the best stuff ever. i do love you, meggie. i always will. and i found myself in the biggest melodrama of all time. the saga of an american family. now, you listen to old fiddler if you wants to keep alive. you in america now. but i think the responsibility of television is to lift up its audience, intellectually, spiritually, and emotionally. is to lift up its audience, intellectually, through programs like this, made available for everyone through contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. seacrest: they captured audiences like nothing before. "rich man, poor man," "roots," "thorn birds." look at the size of those audiences. they poured huge amounts of money
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)